We include Premiere Elements on the list mostly because it’s been an industry leader in the video editing game for some time. And $79.99 is not egregious, but we’re here to say that at that price, you’re mostly paying for the name. In the time since Premiere Elements’ inception, too many other products have surpassed it in speed and capability for us to place it among the cream of the crop. That’s to take nothing away from Premiere Elements’ usability, though—specifically for beginners.
This is an excellent question, and it has a simple and short answer: I make and edit videos with it, so that I can sell them and earn money. My industry is the freelance world for music and video, thus, if there´s software that allows me to make and edit videos quickly, then this software will be one of the main tools for my business, and this is the reason why Movie Maker is a vital piece for my business that allows me to handle most of my video needs.
In the production industry, when most people think about editing software, their minds don't go to Windows Movie Maker on a PC. I'm not an expert on how to achieve that, but I gather a revamped look (which seems more like a professional editing suite) that retains the intuitive, user-friendly feel would be a start. The issue may not be with Movie Maker, but more so a computer's ability to handle the rich files (raw video) and storage required to edit.

Building a DVD from the ground up can be difficult and time-consuming, and the best DVD creators makes it as easy as possible to use their features and tools. Some programs build tutorials directly into their interfaces, while others have free lessons, guides and forums on their official websites.  Additionally, many of the programs we reviewed have free trials, which you can use to determine if the application suits your needs before you pay.  


Other video editing applications have dedicated tracks for video, audio, images, effects, etc. Object based editing makes the program more dynamic and easier to manage tracks. This program also employs proxy editing, in which the program creates lower-resolution copies of videos to use during the editing process. This cuts down on the time it takes to import, render and preview projects before you export them. When you’re done, it uses the original source files to export the final project.
Then, along comes the EOS M5 and M6. I was reluctant to take the plunge due to slow-focusing issues I'd read about. I wanted the smallest possible camera but very high quality. Then, I read that the M6 has a nearly identical APS-C sensor to the new 80D - which has even better dynamic range than my 7D Mii. Then, I thought "but it doesn't have a viewfinder." Well, heck, I take photos all the time with my phone. So, I ordered the M6 with the 15-45 kit lens. I took many test photos. The camera is very easy to work with and I was pleased with the results. Compared to my previous Canon glass, M-lenses are tiny, but they're sharp. Plus, any small faults can be corrected in software. I don't really miss the viewfinder but there is one available to attach to the hot shoe. The controls are intuitive and the touchscreen is a joy to use. Manual exposure is easy to dial in quickly.
Also, you can't leave it powered for too long at a time. I have noticed that if I record small clips for 1.5+ hours then the number of frames that drop increase dramitically, and I have to unplug it to let it cool down. If you want to record voice, it only records voice that comes through the speakers of your television (meaning, if you're recording voice on xbox, go to preferences and set voice to "speaker only" or "Both Headset & Speaker"); however, sound effects of blasts and explosions of games come through very well. The quality of voice recording is pretty bad, but I didn't buy this for voice recording, I bought it for video.

We combined a text opener with five clips linked by a cross-fade-type transition into a 2.5-minute video shot at 60 frames per second, and rendered the projects to the MPEG-4 format at 720p. We timed rendering at both 60 fps and 30 fps. We adjusted settings to take advantage of hardware acceleration for all tests whenever possible, setting them in either the preferences or the rendering controls for the best speeds. Apple’s iMovie, the lone Mac-only app, is not included in the timed comparisons.

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