We host professional development events for faculty members at our university and not everyone who is interested in each event is able to attend. With Movie Maker, we are taking our recordings of the live event, editing out the pre- and post-workshop conversations and any dead time during the event (i.e., individual activities), and making the recordings available to all faculty members (and graduate students). These events (both live and archived) are playing a role in increasing faculty members' activity and development.
Creo videos para clientes que me contactan como profesional independiente, y Windows Movie Maker hace la mayor parte del trabajo por mí. Lo que hago es que recibo cientos de videos de derechos gratuitos, y luego los edito y los combino de maneras únicas, y los clientes que los necesitan para fines personales o comerciales, me contactan y los compran.

Particularly intensive is the process of rendering your finished product into a standard video file that will by playable on the target device of choice, be that an HDTV, a laptop, or a smartphone. Most of the software can take advantage of your computer's graphics processor to speed this up. Be sure to check the performance section in each review linked here to see how speedy or slow the application is. In rendering speed testing, CyberLink and Pinnacle have been my perennial champs. /injects>


Cyberlink is often the first to roll out new and innovative tools and features. For example, it pioneered multi-cam functionality for consumer-level software. That technology was previously only found in professional programs like Adobe Premiere Pro and Final Cut Pro. Cyberlink’s basics are also top-notch. This program has a 99-track timeline, which gives nearly unlimited versatility. You can make simple videos quickly but also delve deeply into complex projects. You may never edit a feature film with this software, but it is more than capable of that task. In our ease-of-use tests, PowerDirector earned an A. Our reviewers noted that the interface is intuitive, the tools are accessible, and even the most advanced features are simple to learn. You can unlock the fullest potential of the program easily if you learn how to use the tools properly.

Most video editing software for consumers and mainstream users is best used for one or another of these specific functions, but there are a few generalists out there, too. We look at the full spectrum: Free video editing software; paid consumer video editing programs that cost $80 or less; and "prosumer" versions that offer deeper feature sets, though usually for high purchase prices. 
Adding and arranging: When you're ready to make a movie, your first step will be to choose what type of files to add. Options include Video, Audio, Image, Icon, and Lyric. You can add any and all of these to the same project and then move them around on the Timeline until you have them where you want them. And if you're new to this type of program, there's a convenient Movie Wizard to guide you through the process.

So you might be a little intimidated by the idea of a DSLR with the different lenses and the switches and the buttons and you were probably hearing me and others rant about the ISO, APS-C, aperture, etc. and wondered what the heck that is and why they are good or bad... Well, completely understandable. And while I recommend reading some good books on the topic (Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson is an excellent one BTW), this phone has a new feature that is sure to make the transition a lot easier and less intimidating. Now the default LCD information view shows like a feature guide. Basically when you select a mode on the knob, the LCD will actually display an easy to understand summary of what that mode is called and basically what it means for your photo. Sometimes with some basic graphics to represent the differences. I turned this off and is using the old-style view, not because I'm a snob, but because I have used DSLRs before and have a little technical experience with it to know what they mean. The guided view is just too bright and I like the dark theme of the standard information view. But this new way of showing the different modes is actually quite awesome if you're just starting out with DSLR photography.
However, simple editing can be done on the cheap if you’re willing to ditch powerful, high-end software such as Final Cut Pro, or Adobe Premiere, in favor of a more modest program. Let’s face it, you’re probably not going to be taking home the Palme d’Or with the film you cut on your laptop, but your home movies and YouTube uploads can take on a whole new shine with a few straightforward tools.
Facebook has long had an app for people who manage Facebook Pages, and it’s also had an app for celebrities that did this kind of community building, too. In fact, Facebook Creator is really just an updated and rebranded version of that app — originally called Facebook Mentions (and still called that, since it seems to be stuck that way on the App Store for now) — but now it’s open to everyone.

When it comes to video editing nobody wants to spend hours mastering nuances of video cutting techniques. All we usually need is to place several pieces together, add some fade-ins and outs, include subtitles and do this with as little efforts as possible. At the same time nobody wants to compromise with the final quality of the video. Indeed, simple not necessarily should mean primitive. VSDC Free Video Editor is a simple and easy to use video editor featuring a lot of functions even a pro editor wouldn't be ashamed of.

Particularly intensive is the process of rendering your finished product into a standard video file that will by playable on the target device of choice, be that an HDTV, a laptop, or a smartphone. Most of the software can take advantage of your computer's graphics processor to speed this up. Be sure to check the performance section in each review linked here to see how speedy or slow the application is. In rendering speed testing, CyberLink and Pinnacle have been my perennial champs.
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