4k and gif support are boilerplate features for most video editing products today, but one thing Filmora does particularly well is titles. Title tools are trending in video software, and while Filmora’s doesn’t have the functionality of say, an Apple Final Cut Pro X, which can superimpose 3D titles over your videos and rotate them on three axes, it nonetheless has some snazzy titling features for the money you’re spending.
While it is simple, it lacks many of the more advanced features found in commercial video editing software, which shouldn't matter to the majority of users of this product. Another issue is that Microsoft has virtually dropped support for this, and is potentially looking to release a newer version at some point. Competitors on the market such as iMovie have continued to be supported with newer features such as 4K support.

The main problem we have in regards to training is knowledge transfer and simplifying training of processes when on-boarding new staff. We do have some videos created from other platforms but no way to share. As we are primarily a Windows shop, using Movie Maker allowed me to create training videos using Microsoft approved codecs and made it much easier to share videos with other team members. The main benefit of course is they can now get some training from the videos we've created and cost savings by not having them go to another facility or rely on other training tools.
Ok—so to those of you working with PCs, this one won’t really apply; but we’d remiss to leave it off the list. If you’re looking for simplicity and elegance, it doesn’t get much better than Apple iMovie. iMovie’s ten high-fidelity filters are some of the classiest in the video editing game; and if you’re shooting on your iPhone, or have been editing a project on your iPad, you can use AirDrop to wirelessly and seamlessly transfer your project over to your Mac.

Apple’s iMovie has long been one of the most consumer-orientated video editors out there. It’s bundled with all new Macs, and touts some serious practicality for the everyday user. The latest version of the software allows you to import and edit 4K video clips from a variety of external devices, such as smartphones and GoPro cameras, and sports a clean interface that is attractive and easy to navigate. The ability to start editing on iPhone or iPad and finish on a Mac renders it even more convenient.

If I had to choose something I dislike about Windows Movie Maker, it would have to be the limit it has in output files. Unlike Avid Media Composer or Adobe Premiere, it seems as though Windows Movie Maker is more limited in the type of files you can export. Also, there isn't much more advanced filters and effects you can customize from. If you're looking to customize your own effects, then maybe Windows Movie Maker isn't right for your project.


However, it doesn’t have all the features and tools we look for in DVD makers, though it has enough to fit the needs of a novice. Before you can burn a DVD, you need to transform your raw footage into a compelling narrative. As such, this program’s video editing tools are its main selling points. It has a standard timeline/storyboard workflow – you compose the broad strokes of your video in the storyboard and fine-tune it in the timeline. One of the software’s biggest drawbacks is you only have eight editing tracks to build your project, and only one is dedicated to video. This limits the program’s versatility and hinders its ability to create complex projects. As a beginner, you might only need eight tracks; however, as you gain experience, it may become a frustration. In addition, the included DVD burner can’t add menus or chapter breaks.

With a full support for dozens of video codecs and formats including but not limiting to AVI, MP4, MKV, MPG, WMV, 3GP, FLV for video; MP3, WAV, WMA, FLAC, PCM, OGG, AAC, M4A, AMR for audio; and BMP, JPG, PNG, PSD, ICO, TIFF for images, VSDC Free Video Editor provides one of the easiest ways to combine multiple source chunks in different formats into a resulting high-quality video. A bunch of filters can turn even a commonplace video sequence into a classy pro-quality movie, while thousands of video and audio effects conveniently grouped into four categories help you making your video to look and sound more dynamic. Not only does VSDC Free Video Editor offer powerful video editing capabilities, it is also surprisingly easy to use. Forget video conversion back and forth between different formats. Import from any devices and cams, including GoPro and drones, is available. Currently it is the only free video editor that allows users to export in a new H.265/HEVC codec, something essential for those working with 4K and HD. New versions have also enabled an easy export to social networks: special profiles for YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. All multimedia processing done from one app: video editing capabilities reinforced by a video converter, a screen capture, a video capture, a disc burner and a YouTube uploader.

Added features such as time remapping for including slow motion, high-speed effects or freeze action are complemented by easily grouping or ungrouping clips on a timeline to edit in bulk or one at a time. With over 1,500 customizable effects, transitions and titles, there’s something for everyone. Even as the video itself is the focus, custom fitting your project with a soundtrack is handled well with custom-fit audio allowing your movies to both look and sound good.
Pinnacle offers an intuitive software program that can be relied on by professionals, but has a simplicity to be navigated by beginners. This program supports a plethora of file formats that has a timeline that makes it extremely easy to edit your video without experiencing any difficulties. However, program has not been updated since 2009 which means there are some compatibility and sustainability issues.
The best video editing applications have tools that allow you to capture, edit and produce videos recorded by action cams like GoPros and Drift Innovation’s Ghost-S. These tools are generally as good as or better than the ones in the software that comes bundled with the cameras themselves. You can use them to stabilize shaky video, correct fish-eye distortion, enhance color, and pan and zoom around your footage. They can even slow down and reverse the video.

A lot of people ask what sort of gear we use for the Stark Insider YouTube channel. We don’t do vlogs, but I would suggest this is a highly flexible camera rig for just about every possible scenario. You could use it for weddings (though if you have the budget the Sony a7S is superb in low light and one of my top 5 camera buys), interviews, sporting events, birthdays, documentary work, live concerts… and, on and on.

The software offer up to seven AutoMovie themes including contemporary, default, fade, cinematic, pan and zoom, sepia, and black & white. Although this collection is nowhere near the one offered by premium options, the themes are presented in simple, good taste. The editing options are quite limited, but its collection of effects is attractive and are applied with a single click.
You can easily add video clips by browsing for videos and audios by using the corresponding button on the timeline. You can also permanent Add videos and photos button on the Home tab. The “Import from Device” option in the File Menu where one can open the Windows Video/Photo importer which allows you to apply keyword tags and saving the images and clips in an organized fashion.

The basic video editing operations such as trimming, splitting are available from the last menu—Edit—and they also snap into view if you double click a clip in your timeline. The Trim tool simply adds start and end handles to the preview window's scrubber line, but you can do the same thing from the main timeline by tapping "Set start point" or "Set end point."
The T#i line is what they call a "pro-sumer" line, which is basically between a consumer line camera like a very basic DSLR and a professional DSLR camera, thus the term "pro-sumer." Typically what this meant is an DSLR with an APS-C sized sensor, decent resolution, and some hand-me-down professional features of pro-grade cameras from a few years ago. For this reason, sometimes it's not worth upgrading from one of these cameras to the next until at least a few generations have past (meaning if you have a T5i, it's not really a giant leap forward to upgrade to a T6i). However, the T7i is somewhat different. When I was doing research on what features it has and what it is missing compared to the pro-grade DSLRs that are considered "current" right now, I was surprised to find very little. The main differences really is that the pro-grade cameras have the LCD display on the top that would display all of your relevant camera settings, and then a few of them would also sport a full-frame sensor. Other than that, the differences are very minor. Something like maybe 1 or 2 frames less in burst mode or something like that. Nothing that would really jump out at you and make you regret not stepping up to the professional grade equivalent (Think it would be the 77D?). It actually has pretty much all of the big features of even their current pro-grade DSLRs, making the T7i probably one of the best prosumer DSLRs to buy.
Like iMovie, Movie Maker uses a simplified version of the standard video editor timeline, with clips represented by "long thumbnails." The first frame is shown at full contrast, while the following ones are faded, in a distinction between this look and iMovie's. The thumbnail tracks optionally show you the audio waveforms along the bottom, so you can see where the loud and quiet parts of your video lay. You get five size choices for the thumbs, which is probably enough, and a zoom control at the bottom lets you stretch out these clip representations. You can trim or split clips using the cursor insertion point combined with edit buttons. It's quite easy once you get used to the unique editing system used by the app: you click at a point in your clip, and can then drag the resulting insertion line around the timeline.
For the amateur video editor, all the functionality that's available can be a bit overwhelming. But if you're looking to produce truly professional-quality video -- without having to deal with watermarks -- Blender is a solid option. The best part: "You are free to use Blender for any purpose, including commercially or for education," according to its website. For the fine print, check out its licensing info.

Purchasing the full version of VideoStudio Ultimate X10 adds a whole extra set of options that beginners will quickly love, including multi-monitor support, easier title creation, and even stop-motion animation. Corel supports almost every output format imaginable, so it's ideal for sharing socially or for hosting online for the world to see. Another highlight for beginners is the inclusion of storyboard mode, which will help draft the exact vision they have in mind for a finished product without wasting hours and days on edits that may never see the light of day.

Lightworks is free video creating software that has been used from some of the best editors in the world with support for all major broadcast formats. This software will give you everything you need to make your movie great. This software works on all three platforms, so, no matter if you are using Windows, Linux or Mac OS X you can still work on this software. You can download it on www.lkws.com. If you use Lightworks for as a video creator you will be able to import, render or export without any problems or delays. You can continue editing while you are importing new material. Not only that Lightworks supports the three main platforms, it also supports the hardware of the main manufacturers. This software also offers the a very powerful trim functions, which will make the editing fast and easy. It also offers powerful and real time effects. It has over 100 inbuilt effect presets. Your video files are already made for all the popular social media. There is also an option to upload your video on your YouTube account. The best side of this application is that it is the fastest application ever.
When using this software, I was able to create videos that helped me teach and motivate students. I was also able to make videos that clarified concepts that we were working on in the classroom. I was able to teach students how to use the software which they did wonderfully. It brought joy to the classroom and the kids were doing something that they clearly enjoyed.
If you want something that is aimed more at the professional from a marketing standpoint, it couldn’t hurt to look into the Vegas Pro line. On its 15th iteration, Vegas has introduced a ton of new features, from hardware acceleration harnessing Intel QSV to a picture-in-picture OFX plug-in, all the way to a super intuitive new instant freeze frame option for referencing shots without stopping workflow. If you opt for the premium, upgraded package (which won’t run cheap), you’ll even get an exhaustive package of NewBlueFX fIlters to color your projects like a true Hollywood flick. What’s interesting about Vegas, and what we think gets overlooked, is they’ve attempted to give you an intuitive set of controls that takes the best of Final Cut, Premiere and others and merges them into one. Sure, it might not have the streamlined, Adobe CS-friendliness of Premiere, nor is it even compatible with Macs, but that’s OK. The workflow in this might just give certain users who can’t quite jive with the other guys a place to truly shine.
Created in 2008, Masher.com allows user to create phenomenal digital work by mixing and integrating photos, music, visual effects and filters. Its vast in-built library allows user to choose the best among thousands to yield better results. The Masher’s library has videos belonging to world’s prominent organizations like BBC, CBS News and China Central Television among others. The music is also provided by experts to create an appealing video.
I´m sorry to say that there are a couple things I don´t like that much: the first thing is that some short videos (less than a couple mega bytes) can delay the software, and it´ll take you a long time to finish uploading them to Windows Movie Maker. For example, sometimes, I upload a short video to edit, and it´s ready in a few seconds. But then, I upload another shorter video to edit, but this takes years to be ready. The last thing I don´t like is that the software stops working out of the blue some times.

At $80 Corel VideoStudio Ultimate X10.5 combines an elegant and professional-feeling interface with high-end specialty features like 3D and 4K Ultra HD, making it one of the most satisfying and versatile consumer-level video editors on the market. It also has an elegant, modern-looking user interface, and can export to YouTube, Facebook, Flickr, and Vimeo with all the options you’d expect. It’s versatile, efficient, and top of its class. (Read our full review.)
But the supplied "MovieStar" capture/editing software's editing functions won't work and the program remains unstable. I keep getting errors like "Unable to build temporary movie for unknown reasons." Of course I read their FAQ and the manual (no section describing the problem.....no troubleshooting section). So far, I am unable to do anything with the clips but trim the ends to shorten them. To do this I have to "produce" a new clip for each editing function. I cannot combine clips by inserting transitions. And it still crashes the system....even with nothing else running. I suspect it is not compatible with my GeForce 256 video card. So I emailed their "support" address through their website [...] explaining the problem and got back a computerized response. Then I called their "support" number (long distance.....not an 800#) and was put on hold with the explanation that the California phone system was on the bugger implying that if I couldn't get hold of them it wasn't their fault. So, I left them a voice mail message with my office number. They called and left me a email where I was supposed to be able to get email support from them (anthonyp@dazzle.com) which was returned to sender.

One of the things that can be a pain in the neck is that if you're working with a long video, and you want to give different types of effects to different parts of this video, then you have to cut out the parts of that same video you need to change, and later, you need to apply the type of effect you want to each of these pieces of videos separately, and then save them like different files. After all that, you need to join them together. It would be lovely that there was an option to achieve this without so much work.
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