Now one big question I know is on everyone's minds. APS-C or Full-Frame? Now the obvious answer is that if you're making money with the camera, go full-frame, if not, APS-C. But actually it's not that simple. First, there's no reason someone doing photography as a hobby shouldn't get a full-frame camera, other than the fact that they cost a whole lot more. But if you can afford it and you want the advantages of a full-frame camera (better resolutions, better low-light photography, etc.) and you don't mind the extra bulk, then why not? And on the flip-side, if you're a pro and want a smaller, less bulky camera to take with you on a shoot, then there's also no reason to say an APS-C camera will not be worth buying... But since you're looking at the T7i, let me go over a few actual advantages to an APS-C camera regardless of your status as an amateur or professional.
Apple iMovie is the ultimate Mac video app for novice filmmakers, combining professional trailers and themes,abundant special effects and an easy-to-learn interface. Version 10.1 added 4K editing and sharing, as well as extended handling to video shot at 1080p and 60 fps. Recent updates tweaked the interface and added Touch Bar support for the latest MacBooks.
Those that have followed my video posts here on Stark Insider over the years know that I’m a die-hard 70D fan. I’ve used it to shoot interviews, live music concerts, backstage Broadway segments, and various food and travel episodes. I especially like the flip-out LCD (handy for framing shots when holding the camera high or very low), the sweet Dual Pixel auto-focus with subject tracking, and quiet performance of Canon’s STM lenses.
VSDC Free Video Editor looks and feels just like a professional video editor. In fact, if feels almost identical to Final Cut Pro in a lot of ways. If you want to experience that style of in-depth video editing, this program is an epic way to do it for free. Be warned, though, that there's a steep learning curve unless you already have some experience.
First is the 1.6x multiplier you get to have for free with telephoto lenses. Because the APS-C sensor is smaller, you're basically "cropping" the image that comes in a lens made for a full-frame camera. Thus the term "crop sensor" used to describe something like an APS-C sized sensor. But rather than cropping the image post-process, all of the camera's light sensing pixels work within this cropped area. So if you buy a lens that is meant to work on a full-frame camera (the way you can tell is by the prefix. An "EF" lens is a full frame lens while an EF-S lens is made for the APS-C sensor. You can use an EF lens on any camera, full frame or APS-C, but if you use an EF-S lens on a full-frame camera the edges of the image will be cut off by the edge of the lens), whatever the specifications are, multiply that by 1.6. So for example, I bought the EF 70-300mm IS II USM lens to use with this. So being that this is an APS-C camera, that lens for me is effectively a 112-480mm lens. Of course the downside of this is if you want a more wide angle, a 10mm EF lens would actually be 18mm, meaning no longer wide-angle. But for those you just make sure to buy an EF-S lens, then the specifications will be correct. For me I have the EF-S 18-135mm IS USM lens for it, and at 18mm it's perfect for general use wide-angle photography. If I wanted even wider there is an EF-S 10-18mm lens out there as well.

Now Matt wants that success for you, and he’s made it easier than ever. Imagine being able to create incredible videos that you can actually sell, in less than 90 seconds! Sounds crazy right? Just minutes from now, you could have an arsenal of sellable videos at your fingertips (50 of them if you act now), that can easily be edited through Matt’s new cloud-based software EZ Video Creator.

There are more video editing software applications than we can fit into this roundup of the best options, which includes only software rated three stars and higher. The best known among them is probably Vegas Movie Studio, which was recently acquired by Magix from Sony. Sony's product used a very cluttered interface that more resembled high-end professional video editing software from the early days of the craft. Magix has made some progress in simplifying it and bringing it up to par with the competition, but more work is needed for it to be included here.
For an option that falls in the middle of the price range, CyberLink has one of the most impressive arsenals of tools -- and it's still easy to use. The recently revamped interface is intuitive, and the features are “content aware,” meaning that they analyze raw footage for things such as shakiness, lighting and faces to create a better final cut. There is also added support for 4K video content.
I absolutely love this thing! I've been creating Halo Reach videos for my clan for the past few months, and there are very few issues that I have with it. When I record on my computer, there are 3 or 4 tiny half-circles at the top of the screen (hardly noticible) and sometimes a small (maybe 1-pixel) line that splits off from the rest of my screen, but all of that can be fixed with the video cropping tool that they have included with the software. I know a few other people who have bought capture cards for cheaper and sometimes it runs a blue line down the right side of the screen if they record in high quality, this does better quality with no blue line.
Of course, none of the extras matter if an app can't do the most basic editing tasks. At this point, however, all of the products included here do a good job of letting you join, trim, and split video clips. They also let you make use of special effects such as animated transitions, picture-in-picture (PiP), chroma-key (the technique that lets you place a subject against any background, often known as green screening), and filters that enhance colors or apply creative effects and distortions. With most of them you can add a multitude of timeline tracks that can accommodate video clips, effects, audio, and text overlays.
Not an expert? Don’t know how to edit videos, have a video studio, or have a bona fide video specialist to shoot and cut your features? That’s alright! The goal of today’s blog is to show you that with the right video editing software, you too can churn out sleek, professional video content—regardless of experience—and keep your content strategy ahead of the curve.
One of the things I really like about working in Movie Maker is that most of the effects, transitions, and themes preview automatically when you just hover the mouse cursor over their buttons. Another plus is the undo and redo buttons are right up top—video editing is a very trial-and-error process—but I suppose it's too much to ask for a history window in such a simple application.

Particularly intensive is the process of rendering your finished product into a standard video file that will by playable on the target device of choice, be that an HDTV, a laptop, or a smartphone. Most of the software can take advantage of your computer's graphics processor to speed this up. Be sure to check the performance section in each review linked here to see how speedy or slow the application is. In rendering speed testing, CyberLink and Pinnacle have been my perennial champs.
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