As easy as CyberLink makes this software to use, there may be times when you need help. To that end, the company established DirectorZone, a community of videographers, filmmakers and aspiring editors. This allows you to connect to, collaborate with and learn from other video makers. DirectorZone is a great resource for editors of all skill levels.

I sincerely believe that if you purchase any of these products that they will NOT work with a PS3 game system. I get the same thing that others get ... "no input signal" ... from the Pinnacle Studio 14 software included with the Dazzle. However I have the same software game for the PC, and despite TWO different capture attempts with other 3rd party software (which have no trouble capturing screen activities otherwise), the UbiSoft game could not be captured at all. Therefore, if you're using a PS3 and you want to capture your gameplay as video you'd better look elsewhere! I KNOW it can be done because the same game(s) ARE captured by others and you can see the videos on YouTube, so there must be a way. I just haven't found it here with the 'Dazzle'. Frankly, I'm not really dazzled by this hardware. Of interesting note there are two other video capture devices sold by Avid/Pinnacle, however they seem to contradict themselves with their Specifications Pages and Feature Pages. In one the Features says you can capture video from '... game systems and others...' however on the same device's Specifications page nowhere does it stipulate which gaming systems you can capture video from! In the other device it's just the reverse (i.e. Spec page says "... game systems...", and the Features page says nothing about gaming systems). Perhaps it's the PS3, or the Software Programs' video is encoded prohibiting captures? Who knows, perhaps this is a good product for video captures from other sources, but this just doesn't work for my PS3!


Windows' included video editing software is all about simplicity: There's really no simpler way to combine your clips into digital movies with titles, transitions, background music, and effects. In earlier releases, the program was so simple that it wasn't capable of doing things people commonly needed, but little by little, stuff like voiceover recording and even anti-shake have made their way into what is now a very useful free app for digital video editing. Let's be clear, Movie Maker still lacks a lot of effects and tools you get in Apple's entry-level video editor, iMovie, not to mention enthusiast-level products like Adobe Premiere Elements or CyberLink PowerDirector, but for basic needs and ease of use, it hits the mark.

Our team of reviewers used each program’s editing tools, effects and export options to create identical test DVDs. They timed how long it took to burn a new DVD, complete with menus and chapters when possible. Our video experts then played the new DVDs on a large-screen television and searched for imperfections such as compression artifact, motion blur and interlacing issues. The results of these tests, as well as our reviewers’ personal experiences using each program, were used to decide the programs’ final scores and ranks. All our tests were designed to replicate the experience of an average user as well as a veteran editor. 
Other recent features include a basic audio editor, the option to make previews for apps you’ve developed, and the even ability to make your own movie trailers complete with transitions and end credits. It’s not a tour de force in terms of video editing, but it’s perfectly suitable for home videos and minor projects. Consider combining it with free audio recording software!
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