Notable features include professional-level color correction, GPU-accelerated real-time effects, video capture, and nearly all-encompassing format support. However, the free version is only capable of exporting MPEG-4 files with a resolution of up to 720p. Thankfully, Lightworks also offers traditional tools for importing, trimming, and seamlessly weaving audio and video together with a few effortless mouse clicks.
For an option that falls in the middle of the price range, CyberLink has one of the most impressive arsenals of tools -- and it's still easy to use. The recently revamped interface is intuitive, and the features are “content aware,” meaning that they analyze raw footage for things such as shakiness, lighting and faces to create a better final cut. There is also added support for 4K video content.
I love movie maker. I have zero background editing videos. I can use files from my phone or my camera and upload them. I can lay over a recorded audio or song recorded with the regular voice recorder on my phone. And can add transitions just as easy as a PowerPoint. Exports into several different file types, all labeled by program. For example- YouTube channel video, face book video, emailing, etc
One of the things I really like about working in Movie Maker is that most of the effects, transitions, and themes preview automatically when you just hover the mouse cursor over their buttons. Another plus is the undo and redo buttons are right up top—video editing is a very trial-and-error process—but I suppose it's too much to ask for a history window in such a simple application.
The free HitFilm Express 9 has a quirky but appealing interface and plenty of powerful features, including a new layout panel and better export tools. An optional Starter Pack ($9.99) adds even more editing options. It's good for prosumers and enthusiasts with cross-platform editing and compositing abilities, tracking options, 2D and 3D effects, speed controls, audio tools and an arsenal of instructional videos.
Adobe Premiere Elements 2018 is perfect for people who want to make home movies to share with friends, but who don’t have much video editing experience. It offers decent functionality for more experienced editors who don’t want to follow the walk-throughs, but other, more robust software might be better if you’re a power user pursuing YouTube stardom.
Windows Movie Maker is free video editing software available on virtually every PC. Developed by Microsoft as part of the standard program suite, it was included in Windows XP and, more recently, Windows 7 and Windows 8. Even though it is not supported for Windows 10, you can still download Windows Movie Maker and install it on this newest operating system, as well. But should you really do that? You can try a powerful alternative like Movavi Video Editor Plus that gives you access to a wider range of tools and is also available to Mac users.
I absolutely love this thing! I've been creating Halo Reach videos for my clan for the past few months, and there are very few issues that I have with it. When I record on my computer, there are 3 or 4 tiny half-circles at the top of the screen (hardly noticible) and sometimes a small (maybe 1-pixel) line that splits off from the rest of my screen, but all of that can be fixed with the video cropping tool that they have included with the software. I know a few other people who have bought capture cards for cheaper and sometimes it runs a blue line down the right side of the screen if they record in high quality, this does better quality with no blue line.
If you are new to video editing and have used only the built-in windows movie maker for some basic video editing before, then Avidemux is another good choice for you. Avidemux is an open source video editing software which means it is free to use. The user interface is not so fancy but there are some preset filters, subtitles hidden in the menus. Avidemux doesn’t feature the ability to share your edited footage to the social media directly, so you may need to save it to your devices first.
I´m sorry to say that there are a couple things I don´t like that much: the first thing is that some short videos (less than a couple mega bytes) can delay the software, and it´ll take you a long time to finish uploading them to Windows Movie Maker. For example, sometimes, I upload a short video to edit, and it´s ready in a few seconds. But then, I upload another shorter video to edit, but this takes years to be ready. The last thing I don´t like is that the software stops working out of the blue some times.
Though Mac users don't have the sheer number of software choices available for PCs, Apple fans interested in editing video are well served, by four products in particular. At the entry level, the surprisingly capable and enjoyable-to-use iMovie comes free with every Mac sold since at least 2011. iMovie only offers two video tracks, but does good job with chroma-keying, and its Trailers feature makes it easy to produce slick, Hollywood-style productions.
I like the simplicity of Windows Moviemaker. I like that the application can be used by a beginner in video editing. This application is perfect for splicing together slideshows and putting together home movies. It's pretty cool that you can also easily share your video. Furthermore, Moviemaker is versatile in that it allows the importation and exportation of a wide variety of file types.

If I had to choose something I dislike about Windows Movie Maker, it would have to be the limit it has in output files. Unlike Avid Media Composer or Adobe Premiere, it seems as though Windows Movie Maker is more limited in the type of files you can export. Also, there isn't much more advanced filters and effects you can customize from. If you're looking to customize your own effects, then maybe Windows Movie Maker isn't right for your project.

If you want a quick and easy way to create and edit videos, I recommend Windows Movie Maker. If you need something quick and easy, this would help you save time. It's very intuitive and no need to learn or buy a new software. If you have a PC, most likely this would already be pre-installed in your computer. So not only does it save you time, but it also saves you money.
I lost my CD that came with my Dazzle, so when I go into my computer and try to reload using the code that came with the product it doesn't work. You can never get a hold of anyone on the phone at the company. And if you push technical support for Dazzle or Avid they tell you to file a claim and see how to get a new ASC code that YOU HAVE TO PAY FOR. That is a bunch of crap, since this is their product. I would not recommend this product to anyone. They say the code they give you when you purchase the product is good for one customer service call, then after that you must purchase another code each and every time you need assistance. Obviously means this is a bad product, if you have to purchase technical support code each time you call them. Wouldn't recommend any of their products.
However, simple editing can be done on the cheap if you’re willing to ditch powerful, high-end software such as Final Cut Pro, or Adobe Premiere, in favor of a more modest program. Let’s face it, you’re probably not going to be taking home the Palme d’Or with the film you cut on your laptop, but your home movies and YouTube uploads can take on a whole new shine with a few straightforward tools.
Video editing has become more and more popular due to the popularity of camcorders and convenience of online video sharing. To save money, you can use some free video editing tools. But it would be a little bit difficult to find a good free video creator as there are too many free video editing programs available on the market. If you are looking for the best choice among them and want your memories in motion, you should check the following top 6 best free video creator.
At the higher end of the Corel product line is Pinnacle Studio—which, at $129.95 (the amount you’ll need to pay to edit 360-degree and 4k content with the “Ultimate” version), costs more than twice as much as VideoStudio. What do you get for the extra money? Well, not only does Pinnacle come readily equipped with all the features you’d expect from an upper-echelon product—motion tracking, 360-degree VR support, 4k support, multi-cam, etc.—but you’d be hard-pressed to find a faster product on the market in terms of rendering.
I bought this used for roughly $45. The set up wasn't too bad, of course there were things I had to figure out and work around to get this to work. The TV I used was an old tv with only composite connection, the one with red, yellow, and white. And the quality was, as you guessed, subpar at best. The biggest problem for me was the subtitles, I could barely read the blurred subtitles in my recordings. I eventually had to buy the madcatz universal cable with the S-video connection to work around this problem. You can youtube how to connect S-video with dazzle for this info.

After using the camera for a couple of weeks, I ordered the M-22mm lens and the EOS lens adapter. I have a couple of older small kit lenses with longer zooms that work well on the M6. And I wanted the 22mm prime for night/low-light shots. The M lenses are so light and tiny they're super-easy to carry around. I'm leaving in a few weeks for Japan and Korea and I'm looking forward to putting this camera through its paces. Plus, it weighs only about one-fourth of my 7D with lens but is capable of similar high quality photographs.
I like the ease of use that goes along with this user interface! It is very easy to learn and allows almost anyone the ability to jump right in and go! This program offers some good motion effects for a slideshow, and allows you to do some good timing cuts for video and audio transitions. There are great video transitions to add some professionalism or even just some fun to your project.
×