Windows Movie Maker es realmente fácil de usar. Lo que más me gusta de este software gratuito es que me permite arrastrar y soltar los videos que tengo dentro, y luego me permite editarlos y unirlos fácilmente. También me encanta el menú superior que me permite agregar texto, música e incluso efectos (como la imagen de video HQ y las "texturas" en blanco y negro), solo haciendo clic una vez en la opción deseada. Realmente creo que editar videos es muy fácil cuando uso Windows Movie Maker.
If you want something that is aimed more at the professional from a marketing standpoint, it couldn’t hurt to look into the Vegas Pro line. On its 15th iteration, Vegas has introduced a ton of new features, from hardware acceleration harnessing Intel QSV to a picture-in-picture OFX plug-in, all the way to a super intuitive new instant freeze frame option for referencing shots without stopping workflow. If you opt for the premium, upgraded package (which won’t run cheap), you’ll even get an exhaustive package of NewBlueFX fIlters to color your projects like a true Hollywood flick. What’s interesting about Vegas, and what we think gets overlooked, is they’ve attempted to give you an intuitive set of controls that takes the best of Final Cut, Premiere and others and merges them into one. Sure, it might not have the streamlined, Adobe CS-friendliness of Premiere, nor is it even compatible with Macs, but that’s OK. The workflow in this might just give certain users who can’t quite jive with the other guys a place to truly shine.
Windows Movie Maker is free video editing software available on virtually every PC. Developed by Microsoft as part of the standard program suite, it was included in Windows XP and, more recently, Windows 7 and Windows 8. Even though it is not supported for Windows 10, you can still download Windows Movie Maker and install it on this newest operating system, as well. But should you really do that? You can try a powerful alternative like Movavi Video Editor Plus that gives you access to a wider range of tools and is also available to Mac users.
Interface design: While the layout of the interface is clear and functional, the color scheme definitely leaves something to be desired. A lot of the text is in gray or brown lettering on a black background, and some menus are even light gray on dark gray, making them almost impossible to read. There are several skins available for this program as well, and they all have the same issues in at least some parts of the interface.
Every other program has dedicated tracks for each type of media such as video, audio, images, etc. The fact that you can use any media on any track makes this software much more dynamic and provides more control over your project. However, the DVD authoring tools in this program fall short of the best we tested. For example, you don’t get the ability add bonus features or save a disc image to your hard drive. While neither of these things are a deal-breaker, they’re both found in our top pick for this category.
Movie Maker uses a very simple version of standard video editor timeline along with clips which are represented by “long thumbnails”. The thumbnail tracks provide options to show the audio waveforms along the bottom, such that you can where are the quiet and loud parts of your video. You also get five different size choices for the thumbs, along with zoom control at the bottom to let you stretch out these clip representation. You can easily trim and split clips by using the cursor insertion point combined with available edit buttons.
This software gives me the ability to combine existing mini films, and merge them in unique and pleasant way so that I can create new engaging video material, and it´s really easy: all I have to do is open the software, then drag all of the videos I want to merge into Windows Movie Maker right box, then choose a couple of effects from the upper panel, then use the cropping tool to refine my new material, and that is all, I have a new video ready to be shared: I think that Windows Movie Maker is the easiest video editing tool you´ll ever find.
Most video editing software for consumers and mainstream users is best used for one or another of these specific functions, but there are a few generalists out there, too. We look at the full spectrum: Free video editing software; paid consumer video editing programs that cost $80 or less; and "prosumer" versions that offer deeper feature sets, though usually for high purchase prices. 
First, I already kind of mentioned, but the grid view inside the viewfinder, they should give you options and the "thirds" grid should definitely be an option as the "rule of thirds" is a very good guide to follow in the absence of a clearer way to frame a photo. I hope in their future cameras they will have this. Or if somehow a firmware upgrade could add this, I'm not sure how hard-wired this grid is in the viewfinder if moving the lines would even be possible through software...
Apple’s Final Cut Pro X software falls into what we call the “prosumer” category because it treads the line between a product for consumers who want to up their video-editing game and one for professionals who need powerful editing tools. It lacks a traditional timeline-track interface, which is enough to scare some users off, but the software is intuitive and powerful nonetheless. It has great organizational tools like libraries, ratings, tagging, auto analysis for faces and scenes, and automatic color coding for track-specific clips, useful keyboard short-cuts and drag-and-drop media importing give Adobe’s Premiere Elements a run for its money. Unfortunately, you can't directly open projects from Final Cut Pro 7 or earlier, but there are many third-party plug-ins that will help you out there.​
The last downside, and perhaps the biggest one for some people, is the lack of 4K video recording. It's kind of a disappointment that phones can do it now but this DSLR still cannot. There are some comparably priced DSLRs from Nikon and others like Sony that have this feature. But honestly, even without this I will still prefer to stay with Canon simply because your camera is only as good as your lens, and Canon has probably the best lenses out there, but definitely without question has the widest selection of lenses to choose from.
The set of features provided in Windows Movie Maker is, yet again, quite modest. You can use only a handful of effects and transitions there, compared to the impressive collection offered in Movavi Video Editor Plus. The same goes for title presets. When you edit your projects, whether at home or in the office environment, you’d probably want a bit more room for creativity. This is precisely what is available to Movavi users, together with handy features like callouts, auto adjustment, and timeline mode.
When it comes to video editing nobody wants to spend hours mastering nuances of video cutting techniques. All we usually need is to place several pieces together, add some fade-ins and outs, include subtitles and do this with as little efforts as possible. At the same time nobody wants to compromise with the final quality of the video. Indeed, simple not necessarily should mean primitive. VSDC Free Video Editor is a simple and easy to use video editor featuring a lot of functions even a pro editor wouldn't be ashamed of.

Apple’s Final Cut Pro X software falls into what we call the “prosumer” category because it treads the line between a product for consumers who want to up their video-editing game and one for professionals who need powerful editing tools. It lacks a traditional timeline-track interface, which is enough to scare some users off, but the software is intuitive and powerful nonetheless. It has great organizational tools like libraries, ratings, tagging, auto analysis for faces and scenes, and automatic color coding for track-specific clips, useful keyboard short-cuts and drag-and-drop media importing give Adobe’s Premiere Elements a run for its money. Unfortunately, you can't directly open projects from Final Cut Pro 7 or earlier, but there are many third-party plug-ins that will help you out there.​

What Adobe Premiere Pro is to Windows PCs, Final Cut Pro X is to Mac users. It's the best video editing software for Mac. And, as you would suspect with Apple software, the must-have editor is consummately easy to use and comes packed with enough features to warrant the admittedly high price tag. We like the grouping tools, effect options and the simplistic way you can add and edit audio. If you're already entwined in Apple's ecosystem, you'll appreciate how Final Cut cleverly coordinates with your Photos or iTunes collections.


One of the things I really like about working in Movie Maker is that most of the effects, transitions, and themes preview automatically when you just hover the mouse cursor over their buttons. Another plus is the undo and redo buttons are right up top—video editing is a very trial-and-error process—but I suppose it's too much to ask for a history window in such a simple application.
All the video editing programs we reviewed can help you blend your footage, audio clips and images to create new and unique videos. They also all offer basic nonlinear video editing tools. Timelines, storyboards, transitions, titles and audio editing are all common fare for the products we reviewed. These applications also have video effect libraries. The number of available effects varies from program to program; however, a library with more than 500 effects is usually sufficient for any non-professional project.
While most professional-grade software can handle multi-cam editing, Premiere Pro goes one step beyond, handling as many sources as necessary with as many angles as required. The inclusion of the bundled Lumetri Color Panel allows advanced color adjustments to be handled with ease. Additionally, Adobe’s integration with After Effects and Photoshop adds even more reason for professional grade editors to choose Premiere Pro.
In the midrange, there's Adobe Premiere Elements, which is cross-platform between Macs and PCs, and offers a lot more features and lots of help with creating effects. Professionals and prosumers have powerful, though pricey options in Final Cut Pro X and Adobe Premiere Pro. Final Cut is a deceptively simple application that resembles iMovie in its interface and ease of use, but it offers massively deep capabilities, and many third-party apps integrate with it for even more power. It also makes excellent use of the Touch Bar on the latest MacBook Pro, as shown in photo above. Premiere Pro uses a more traditional timeline and adds a large ecosystem of companion apps and plug-ins. It also excels in collaboration features.
More options when exporting. Possibility to change the Movie Maker mode from "Beginner" that includes todays Movie Maker functionality to "Expert" that will offer the video editing functionality for the experienced users. Like this this tool can be used by both beginners and experienced users. Because today the experienced users try to avoid Movie Maker. "Beginner" and "Expert" Movie Maker modes could increase the target group of the Movie Maker users.

Avid Media Composer's latest version comes with a wealth of new and improved features, such as accelerated high-res-to-HD workflows and automated media management to handle background media tasks while you focus on your creative vision. The $999 price tag is steep for amateurs, but worth it if you're looking for a professional-grade software. As the editing software of choice for summer blockbusters like Star Trek and The Great Gatsby, Avid Media Composer 7 can handle any editing challenge with ease.
One of the things that can be a pain in the neck is that if you're working with a long video, and you want to give different types of effects to different parts of this video, then you have to cut out the parts of that same video you need to change, and later, you need to apply the type of effect you want to each of these pieces of videos separately, and then save them like different files. After all that, you need to join them together. It would be lovely that there was an option to achieve this without so much work.
One of the most beneficial factors of Movie Maker in the workplace is the possibility of making video presentations in record time, easy and with predesigned styles that make my work much easier and save me time. It helps my clients to better understand their completed projects and to process in a lighter and more dynamic way terms and modules that they do not handle.
The Powershot GX 3 I purchased to backup my EOS 7D Mark II didn't work out because of the steep drop-off in IQ. I decided to give the EOS M6 a try after reading up on mirrorless cameras, and noting that the M6 sports an APS-C sensor. I took it for a shoot at a botanical garden the day after receiving it, and I'm generally pleased with the results. I shot mainly with the EF-M 18-150mm lens, and I made sparing use of the EF-M 11-22. Both lenses produced some decent shots, and they kept the overall size and weight of my gear down. I've humped the 7DMKII with a Sigma 50-150mm lens, and I'm inclined to forgive a small dropoff in IQ in return for a much smaller, lighter kit. The M6 may struggle to backup to the 7DMKII for action shots. The 7DMKII focuses more quickly and rattles off 10 frames in the blink of an eye. That said, the M6 did a creditable job of capturing a macro shot of a flower-hopping Bumble Bee (photo attached). It's going to take time to get used to using the tilt screen instead of a viewfinder for composing shots, but it became more comfortable the more I shot. Bright sunlight is a challenge, but not an insurmountable one. The tilt screen also helped in framing close to the ground shots without having to dig my knees in the dirt. Time will tell, but first impressions of the M6 are quite positive.
With an attractive interface, a multitude of video effects and the ability to upload directly to Facebook, Vimeo, Box and YouTube, Pinnacle Studio has long been a favorite in video editing. While it is one of the more expensive options in this list, and it doesn’t have 4K UHD support, Pinnacle serves as a nice middle-ground option for those who aren’t slackers in the video editing department, but who haven’t reached pro status just yet.
The T#i line is what they call a "pro-sumer" line, which is basically between a consumer line camera like a very basic DSLR and a professional DSLR camera, thus the term "pro-sumer." Typically what this meant is an DSLR with an APS-C sized sensor, decent resolution, and some hand-me-down professional features of pro-grade cameras from a few years ago. For this reason, sometimes it's not worth upgrading from one of these cameras to the next until at least a few generations have past (meaning if you have a T5i, it's not really a giant leap forward to upgrade to a T6i). However, the T7i is somewhat different. When I was doing research on what features it has and what it is missing compared to the pro-grade DSLRs that are considered "current" right now, I was surprised to find very little. The main differences really is that the pro-grade cameras have the LCD display on the top that would display all of your relevant camera settings, and then a few of them would also sport a full-frame sensor. Other than that, the differences are very minor. Something like maybe 1 or 2 frames less in burst mode or something like that. Nothing that would really jump out at you and make you regret not stepping up to the professional grade equivalent (Think it would be the 77D?). It actually has pretty much all of the big features of even their current pro-grade DSLRs, making the T7i probably one of the best prosumer DSLRs to buy.
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