We evaluated all of the software based on functionality, ease of use, performance, sharing options and new features in the latest versions. We also judged the packages based on real-life uses for a number of categories, including best overall, best free app, best for beginners, best for YouTube maestros, best for Mac users and best for Windows platforms.
What Adobe Premiere Pro is to Windows PCs, Final Cut Pro X is to Mac users. It's the best video editing software for Mac. And, as you would suspect with Apple software, the must-have editor is consummately easy to use and comes packed with enough features to warrant the admittedly high price tag. We like the grouping tools, effect options and the simplistic way you can add and edit audio. If you're already entwined in Apple's ecosystem, you'll appreciate how Final Cut cleverly coordinates with your Photos or iTunes collections.
Created in 2008, Masher.com allows user to create phenomenal digital work by mixing and integrating photos, music, visual effects and filters. Its vast in-built library allows user to choose the best among thousands to yield better results. The Masher’s library has videos belonging to world’s prominent organizations like BBC, CBS News and China Central Television among others. The music is also provided by experts to create an appealing video.
There is an awesome video creator called "VideoMakerFX". Althought, it may seem that it is a typical software of that type,but it has a lot distinquishable features,which will help you to create the best video. However, it costs quite a lot, but you can download it with a 40% discount using the following link: https://bit.ly/2Obzouh Thank you for spending time to read my comment - have a nice day! Eugene.
These aren't just your quick videos that give a few tips. These videos are based on the weekly Video Creators podcast and take time to go more in-depth and explore the details of growing a YouTube channel and an audience. Sometimes they're live streams, other times they're long-form interviews. Either way, you'll enjoy digging deeper into audience growth topics in this playlist.
Free video editing software often comes with legal and technical limitations, however. Some widely used codecs require licensing fees on the part of the software maker, meaning they can't offer free software that can handle these standard file formats. That said, the impressive open-source Shotcut does a lot of the same things that the paid applications in this roundup do, including things like chroma-keying and picture-in-picture. Shotcut is completely open-source and free, while another free option, Lightworks has paid options that remove a 720p output resolution limit. Note also that both Shotcut and Lightworks run on Linux as well as Windows and Mac.
What I liked the most is the video editing because even if you are new to all of this, it will be easy for you to follow the tutorial and be as professional as all the other video editors. There is nothing complicated in the program, I've tried many other video editing programs, but this one by far the easiest of all and still give you the most satisfying results.
We also spoke with Richard Dutcher, an independent filmmaker and director of eight feature films including “Brigham City,” “Falling," "God's Army” and “Evil Angel.” He told us that the time you spend learning a new program is at a premium. “I like things that are intuitive and with the fastest learning curve. The less time spent becoming familiar and proficient the better. The sooner I can get to work and putting the film together - that’s the most important thing to me.”

On the nikon side you might looking at the Nikon D3400 or the Nikon D5600. Both of these cameras were released last year and they’re both very nice. The D5600 is the most similar and also has a fully articulating screen. If you’ve never used a nikon dslr before it might take you a little while to get used, but again both of these cameras are quite good although I would still give the advantage to the T7i.


I've had big trouble finding free video editor for windows until I've found this. After using it for ½ year for youtubing and gamining videos I bought it for ca. 20$. That unlocked few futures like faster rendering and adaptive alfa background remover. They are constantly developing so once in a while there are new options. Last update was 64bit hardware enhancement for faster rendering and editing, previews update gave us 4K videos. Thanks VSDC
Apple’s iMovie has long been one of the most consumer-orientated video editors out there. It’s bundled with all new Macs, and touts some serious practicality for the everyday user. The latest version of the software allows you to import and edit 4K video clips from a variety of external devices, such as smartphones and GoPro cameras, and sports a clean interface that is attractive and easy to navigate. The ability to start editing on iPhone or iPad and finish on a Mac renders it even more convenient.
The main problem we have in regards to training is knowledge transfer and simplifying training of processes when on-boarding new staff. We do have some videos created from other platforms but no way to share. As we are primarily a Windows shop, using Movie Maker allowed me to create training videos using Microsoft approved codecs and made it much easier to share videos with other team members. The main benefit of course is they can now get some training from the videos we've created and cost savings by not having them go to another facility or rely on other training tools.
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