Very simple, easy-to-use video creation software that is highly accessible to PC users. Interface is consistent with other Microsoft products (ribbon interface) which ensures some familiarity for those with experience with any of Microsoft's other products (especially recent versions of Office). It has all the basic video editing tools available, as well as a good selection of transition and visual effects.
Another thing I don't like is how they decided to "encode" their batteries. I'm sure there's some advantage to it, most likely safety to ensure you're using a genuine Canon battery they can quality control, but how it's affected me is that now buying an aftermarket battery means that you won't get a read-out of how much power you have left while using them. Not a huge deal, but it is kind of annoying. I like to have spare batteries, but at almost $60 a pop, no way I can afford to have a genuine Canon one. So I'll have to live with one made by a 3rd party and not knowing how much power is left in it if I have to use it... It also means the Canon charger will refuse to charge these batteries, so the 3rd party charger will be required to charge up these 3rd party batteries...
Cyberlink PowerDirector 16 Ultra is a prosumer video editor that aims to bring every feature under the sun to a video editor that is accessible and affordable. There’s nothing else in this price range that brings you this many well-implemented features, especially in 360 video. Complexity is its one challenge: The user interface is not always self-explanatory, and the inclusion of so many features means it can be difficult to find what you want. Read our full review. 
The T7i is a worthwhile upgrade from the T5i I previously purchased. Without getting into the expensive full-frame cameras, I received a 33% upgrade in megapixels, double the effective ISO, and slightly faster burst speed, from 5 to 6. The auto-focus is improved and buttons for quick access to display modes and ISO added. The built-in WiFi will allow quick transfer to mobile devices with the Canon app only. Bluetooth is only for camera control, and pictures cannot be transferred via bluetooth.
I make videos and brochures for a living, and one of the tolos I frequently use is Windows Movie Maker. There are two things I like about this software: first and foremost, is really easy to use: you can find all of the features easily on the user panel and add them with only one click, which is a pretty cool feature. The other thing I like is that adding music, credits, black and white effects, and many more additions to make your video creation more beautiful is also a piece of cake.
Finally, we used each program to compress a 4K video file into a smaller resolution. We then examined the results looking for imperfections in the picture such as compression artifacts, motion blur, distortion, ghosting and more. PowerDirector’s results were simply outstanding. We could find almost no indication that the video had been compressed, even when viewed on an ultra-high-definition monitor.
He went on to say that your end goal should also play a big part in your decision, advising that if you’ll edit video infrequently, you should get simpler software. “If it’s a one-off project, the fewer whistles the better,” Tyler said.  He called out Adobe Premiere Elements and Wondershare Filmora as good choices because they have easy-to-understand workflows for non-editors.

That’s assuming you’re just exporting files. You may want to burn a DVD or Blu-ray disc, or upload your videos directly to YouTube or Facebook. Each of these comes with its own set of necessary features that some apps have and others don’t. For disc burning, you need not only support for the right formats, but DVD menu authoring tools so viewers can navigate what you’re presenting. On the social side, it’s much easier if the application syncs up directly with your account online and allows you to enter metadata like a description, tags, and privacy settings.


Wondershare Filmora supports a wide range of video formats, including .MP4, .AVI, .MOV, .AVCHD and many more. It also enables you to crop, trim, cut, split and even combine footage with a few easy clicks of the mouse. What's more, it also provides various filters and visual effects to help you touch up your video. Currently, there are more than 300 builtin effects available, and you can find more effects on Filmora Effects Store.

Our biggest issue with VideoPad was not knowing which features were disabled in the free version versus the trial and paid versions. We found VideoPad to be a bit slower on our transcoding tests than Hitfilm, too. But that may not matter for those looking for an app that they can use to quickly and easily edit video and then upload to the social media outlet of their choice.

The T#i line is what they call a "pro-sumer" line, which is basically between a consumer line camera like a very basic DSLR and a professional DSLR camera, thus the term "pro-sumer." Typically what this meant is an DSLR with an APS-C sized sensor, decent resolution, and some hand-me-down professional features of pro-grade cameras from a few years ago. For this reason, sometimes it's not worth upgrading from one of these cameras to the next until at least a few generations have past (meaning if you have a T5i, it's not really a giant leap forward to upgrade to a T6i). However, the T7i is somewhat different. When I was doing research on what features it has and what it is missing compared to the pro-grade DSLRs that are considered "current" right now, I was surprised to find very little. The main differences really is that the pro-grade cameras have the LCD display on the top that would display all of your relevant camera settings, and then a few of them would also sport a full-frame sensor. Other than that, the differences are very minor. Something like maybe 1 or 2 frames less in burst mode or something like that. Nothing that would really jump out at you and make you regret not stepping up to the professional grade equivalent (Think it would be the 77D?). It actually has pretty much all of the big features of even their current pro-grade DSLRs, making the T7i probably one of the best prosumer DSLRs to buy.

Creating a new video from existing ones becomes really easy by using Windows Movie Maker. It gives me the ability to prepare, edit, and deliver videos to my audience and clients, and they really love the material I deliver. I simply thin that the best thing freelancers can do is to communicate what their service is about with an awesome and engaging video.
One of the things I really like about working in Movie Maker is that most of the effects, transitions, and themes preview automatically when you just hover the mouse cursor over their buttons. Another plus is the undo and redo buttons are right up top—video editing is a very trial-and-error process—but I suppose it's too much to ask for a history window in such a simple application.
This video editor gives you tons of control and editing power, but you'll have to know how to use it. The program could use a manual to help novice users comb through all of the features. Without that, VSDC Free Video Editor will take a lot of experimenting or previous editing know-how to figure out. It's worth spending plenty of time with, though.
Also, you can't leave it powered for too long at a time. I have noticed that if I record small clips for 1.5+ hours then the number of frames that drop increase dramitically, and I have to unplug it to let it cool down. If you want to record voice, it only records voice that comes through the speakers of your television (meaning, if you're recording voice on xbox, go to preferences and set voice to "speaker only" or "Both Headset & Speaker"); however, sound effects of blasts and explosions of games come through very well. The quality of voice recording is pretty bad, but I didn't buy this for voice recording, I bought it for video.
Although it’s said to created intros for video ads or promo videos with logo stingers, I see no reason it’s only for a particular user. With Intro Video Creator, you can hold your customers till the end of your videos and maximize your video ads. But if you’re not a vendor, or an affiliate, you can still try this amazing product to make intros for personal uses. It will be the savior for your boring presentation.

Filmora Video Editor for Windows (or Filmora Video Editor for Mac) is a popular video creator for new beginners as well. It contains all the features that a beginner need to create his or her videos. Basic editing features are: cropping, splitting, merging, trimming. Stabilizing videos is available if you think your footage is not great enough. Hand-picked motion graphics, filters, overlays, transitions, split scree, titles, and more will make your videos quite different and great. Now you can download the free trial version to see whether it is suitable for you or not.
In the midrange, there's Adobe Premiere Elements, which is cross-platform between Macs and PCs, and offers a lot more features and lots of help with creating effects. Professionals and prosumers have powerful, though pricey options in Final Cut Pro X and Adobe Premiere Pro. Final Cut is a deceptively simple application that resembles iMovie in its interface and ease of use, but it offers massively deep capabilities, and many third-party apps integrate with it for even more power. It also makes excellent use of the Touch Bar on the latest MacBook Pro, as shown in photo above. Premiere Pro uses a more traditional timeline and adds a large ecosystem of companion apps and plug-ins. It also excels in collaboration features.
Once you’ve cut your teeth with the basic video editing tools, you can move on to using the more powerful ones. The best editing software is compatible with all the latest video and audio technology on the market today. For example, they can import, edit and export at ultra-high-definition 4K resolution. This makes your videos crisp, clear and enjoyable on today’s large ultra-HD televisions.
The Edit menu also contains the new Stabilization choice if you're running Windows 8 or 8.1, as well as play speedup and slow-mo (this retains the audio, so you can have fun making you and your friends sound like chipmunks or lions). As in iMovie, all editing is done in the same thumbnail/timeline area—no popup windows for trimming like you find in other video editors like CyberLink PowerDirector.
There are tons of in-program effects such as transitions, titles, credits, captions and even included audio scores, meaning you won’t get held up at any step of your editing process. There are panning and shift capabilities, high-quality post-processing zoom, as well as a plethora of color filtering plugins to give you the look you’ll need, even if the raw footage isn’t quite there. You’ll have the ability to export your movies in up to 4K resolution, and the software even supports 360-degree video projects. It’s a great powerhouse for beginners.
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Even though Windows Movie Maker has a wide variety of special effects, some of them look a little tacky when implemented. Especially if you use a lot of them within a short span of one video. Also, a great feature of Windows Movie Maker is that you can add subtitles to your video. The problem is that this can become a little tedious when you have to manually put them in.
The easiest way to get video clips into Movie Maker is to tap the "Click here to browse for videos and photos" button in the main timeline area. There's also a permanent Add videos and photos button on the Home tab. Each button opens the Pictures library, where most people's point-and-shoot videos land when they import from camera media. There's also an "Import from Device" choice in the File menu; this just opens the Windows photo/video importer, which actually does a decent job of letting you apply keyword tags and saves the image and clips to date-and-time-organized folders—not unlike iPhoto's "Events." And finally, you can start capturing video from your PC's webcam.

When it comes to free video editing software, Filmora is about as multi-faceted as they come. Filmora is Wondershare’s standard, simple, high-quality video editing offering; but Wondershare also offers FilmoraGo (for mobile editing) and Filmora Scrn (for screen recording and editing). The design is intuitive and easy to use, and comes replete with filters, overlays, motion elements, transitions, and a small selection of royalty-free music. Here are a few more of the “basics” Filmora offers: 


Start your quest for the best video editing software by signing up for the free trial or demo offered by popular video editing software providers. This will enable you to test drive each application’s top features free of cost, do a general comparison, and gauge their suitability for your purposes. Start by visiting the websites of the following leading tools to check the possibility of availing a free trial: Adobe Premiere Pro, CyberLink PowerDirector, Pinnacle Studio Ultimate, and Final Cut Pro. These programs have received high rankings in our video editing software reviews, so check them out. 

Final Cut Pro: Offers speed and power for the new generation of video editors. The latest edition boasts a clean new look and a low-profile interface that increases work space. An interesting feature is the improved Magnetic Timeline 2 feature that offers flexible layouts based on roles and automatic color coding. The latest release is ideal for the new MacBook Pro as it supports wide color workflows and the Touch Bar.


The ISO is also quite high for a prosumer grade camera, at 25,600. Obviously even with the best cameras using very high ISO's will result in more noise in your photos, but when it's capable of such high maximum ISO's, that means you can push the ISO numbers higher with less noise. For an example, with my T3i, once I hit ISO800, the image is already getting quite noisy. On the other hand, with the T7i, I've shot photos at ISO6400 (8x that for you not so handy at math, lol) before I start to notice some noise. So low-light photography is actually quite nice with the T7i, as are low-light movies.
Shooting movies is also great now with the servo AF feature. My T3i required that I manually focused while shooting movies. With the servo AF, the camera will actually follow the moving subject adjusting the focus on the fly. I mean, your cell phone can do it and so could my point-and-shoot Canon camera, but their old DSLRs actually didn't have that feature, but now (well, since like the T5i I think) they do and it's very useful. Speaking of movie mode, I very much like that they added another step in the power switch for movie mode instead of requiring you to turn the knob all the way to the very end to get to movie mode. Now you simply flip the switch to it.
You’ll find the familiar timeline/storyboard workflow, along with other basic tools such as titles and credits, effects and transitions, and a chroma-key (green screen). It also has some, but not all, of the advanced tools you need to make an outstanding video. You’ll get a video stabilizer to smooth out shaky footage, 4K compatibility for footage from the newest cameras, 3D editing, motion tracking and more. These are all great tools, and it’s a great bang for your buck. But there are some significant trade-offs. For example, there are no themes or templates. So, you’ll need to build every project from scratch – not very appealing to beginners. It also lacks an automatic video creator and slideshow creator, which are also great for novices. This program lacks multi-cam and 360-degree editing features that you would find on more expensive programs. If you want the newest, greatest effects and tools, this is not the program for you. In addition, the program’s interface is in bad need of a face-lift, and has been for years. It’s kind of hard to get around, and it will require working through a few projects before you can use it effectively.
Another great advanced tool found in PowerDirector Ultra is the multi-cam module. This allows you to import footage of an event taken from multiple sources, sync them up and then switch between angles easily. The result is a seamless single video that has the look and feel of a professionally produced piece. This is especially useful for events that have been recorded on several smartphones.
Another program, VSDC Video Editor Pro, simply has too outdated an interface, making common tasks difficult. Longtime pro video editors will note the absence of Avid Media Composer, which is simply too unwieldy for PCMag's primarily consumer audience. There are a couple of more interesting applications—NCH VideoPad and AVS Video Editor among them—that we simply haven't tested yet.
The next advantage is something I already touched on earlier. The size and bulk. These prosumer line cameras are typically much smaller and lighter than their pro-grade cousins. However, I am now completely spoiled by USM lenses (specifically their new nano-USM system), and they are unfortunately bulkier than the "kit lenses" that typically come with these cameras. But overall even with the bulkier lenses, it'll still be much easier to move around with the T7i than with a 5D or a 1D...
Though Mac users don't have the sheer number of software choices available for PCs, Apple fans interested in editing video are well served, by four products in particular. At the entry level, the surprisingly capable and enjoyable-to-use iMovie comes free with every Mac sold since at least 2011. iMovie only offers two video tracks, but does good job with chroma-keying, and its Trailers feature makes it easy to produce slick, Hollywood-style productions.
Its 360-degree footage tools allow you to set anchor points, pan and zoom through your footage, add effects, and stabilize shaky recordings. The program even has dedicated 360-degree titles that match your footage perfectly, rather than trying to warp a regular title to fit. And with the view designer, you can convert 360-degree videos to work with conventional projects.
I found out about VSDC from an internet search, after realising that my video editing needs were not being met by microsoft windows video editing software, as well as not having a budget to spend on anything that only did half the job or could only read certain video file types (especially for more complex editing tasks or legacy formats). VSDC video editor is the main product I use - mainly in creating youtube videos. It takes a while to get used to the way things are played out and had to take advice from a fellow youtuber as to how to utilise the settings, but was much less difficult than other more costly software like Final Cut Pro HD, etc.
Its 360-degree footage tools allow you to set anchor points, pan and zoom through your footage, add effects, and stabilize shaky recordings. The program even has dedicated 360-degree titles that match your footage perfectly, rather than trying to warp a regular title to fit. And with the view designer, you can convert 360-degree videos to work with conventional projects.
Of course, none of the extras matter if an app can't do the most basic editing tasks. At this point, however, all of the products included here do a good job of letting you join, trim, and split video clips. They also let you make use of special effects such as animated transitions, picture-in-picture (PiP), chroma-key (the technique that lets you place a subject against any background, often known as green screening), and filters that enhance colors or apply creative effects and distortions. With most of them you can add a multitude of timeline tracks that can accommodate video clips, effects, audio, and text overlays.
Though you can create video slideshows in the Photo app in Windows 10, it doesn’t have a standalone video editor like Windows Movie Maker for Windows 10. If you are looking for a movie maker for your Windows computer, you are in the right place. Here we will take a look at top 5 best alternatives to Windows Movie Maker to allow you to create the best art you can.
Since each organization has specific business wants, it is sensible for them to abstain from searching for a one-size-fits-all perfect software solution. Needless to say, it would be pointless to try to find such a system even among widely used software applications. The intelligent thing to do would be to list the various vital elements that need consideration such as key features, budget, skill levels of staff members, company size etc. Then, you should do your research thoroughly. Read some Windows Movie Maker reviews and check out each of the other apps in your shortlist in detail. Such in-depth homework can make sure you weed out ill-fitting systems and zero in on the system that provides all the elements you need for business success.

Because it's so deeply entwined with the macOS, iMovie was one of the fastest apps when it came to encoding video. Once that's finished, it also gives you plenty of sharing options: You can upload directly to YouTube, Facebook and Vimeo, and share any video frame as an image. When you couple iMovie with iMovie Theater and iCloud, you can also view your creations on any Apple device or via Apple TV.
However, simple editing can be done on the cheap if you’re willing to ditch powerful, high-end software such as Final Cut Pro, or Adobe Premiere, in favor of a more modest program. Let’s face it, you’re probably not going to be taking home the Palme d’Or with the film you cut on your laptop, but your home movies and YouTube uploads can take on a whole new shine with a few straightforward tools.