Adobe is an instantly recognisable name to most, and its Premiere Elements 15 program is a great choice for both beginners and experienced editors. It isn't as complex as the more heavyweight Premiere Pro video editor (listed below), which is best suited to full-time video editing professionals. But Adobe Premiere Elements is packed with excellent features, such as face detection, audio effects and bundled soundtracks. And it's friendly to use, too.
The set of features provided in Windows Movie Maker is, yet again, quite modest. You can use only a handful of effects and transitions there, compared to the impressive collection offered in Movavi Video Editor Plus. The same goes for title presets. When you edit your projects, whether at home or in the office environment, you’d probably want a bit more room for creativity. This is precisely what is available to Movavi users, together with handy features like callouts, auto adjustment, and timeline mode.
The whole experience is geared around making it as easy as possible to turn your project into reality. There are two modes in this program: Easy and Full Feature. Easy mode guides you through the video editing process step by step. It’s a great way to familiarize yourself with the process. You can create some fine videos in this mode, but to really take advantage of Filmora’s wide toolset, you need to use the Full Feature Mode. This mode gives you access to tools from basic trimming and cropping to advanced features like picture-in-picture editing, audio mixer, chroma-key, split screen, video stabilization and much more. Filmora excels at teaching users to use these tools, and anyone with the patience to learn will find it useful. Filmora also has some of the best sharing options of the programs we reviewed. When you’re done with your project, you can export it to a file, upload it to YouTube (or other video-sharing site) or even burn a DVD.
Headquartered in New York City, Animoto is online and mobile video maker which enables a user to choose his own pictures, music, clips and turns into magical video slideshows. Founded in 2005, the website creator offers great digital experience and cloud-computing service with options like vast music library and video style options. Animoto bags second position in the countdown.
Shooting movies is also great now with the servo AF feature. My T3i required that I manually focused while shooting movies. With the servo AF, the camera will actually follow the moving subject adjusting the focus on the fly. I mean, your cell phone can do it and so could my point-and-shoot Canon camera, but their old DSLRs actually didn't have that feature, but now (well, since like the T5i I think) they do and it's very useful. Speaking of movie mode, I very much like that they added another step in the power switch for movie mode instead of requiring you to turn the knob all the way to the very end to get to movie mode. Now you simply flip the switch to it.
As easy as CyberLink makes this software to use, there may be times when you need help. To that end, the company established DirectorZone, a community of videographers, filmmakers and aspiring editors. This allows you to connect to, collaborate with and learn from other video makers. DirectorZone is a great resource for editors of all skill levels.
The free HitFilm Express 9 has a quirky but appealing interface and plenty of powerful features, including a new layout panel and better export tools. An optional Starter Pack ($9.99) adds even more editing options. It's good for prosumers and enthusiasts with cross-platform editing and compositing abilities, tracking options, 2D and 3D effects, speed controls, audio tools and an arsenal of instructional videos.
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One of iMovie’s most coveted features is its green-screen, or “chroma-key” tool, which allows you to place your characters in exotic locations—Hawaii, say—at a moment’s notice. Want to overlay the scene with “Somewhere Over the Rainbow”? iMovie ties directly in with iTunes and GarageBand, so you can easily implement custom tracks and sounds. When your movie’s finally ready to ship, release it into the wild using iMessage, Facebook, YouTube, or any other of iMovie’s succinctly connected platforms.
Whether you’re a professional video editor or an amateur, video is a universal way to enjoy, share and create memories that can last forever. No matter if you’re capturing life’s best (and worst) moments via a smartphone, DSLR or even a point-and-shoot camera, editing video will allow you to highlight and share the footage with the world. Which video editor you use to ship your final product is best determined by your needs, the type of computer you own and, of course, your budget. With those factors in mind, here’s our take on the best video editors available today.
Early one morning in December 2013, I wandered into where my computer desktop was located. My wife asked “What do you think about this deal?” “You’re buying me a Canon 5D Mk III?” She answered “Yes”. I said “Go for it! But let me check B&H”. The 5D package on Amazon was $4000. I found a similar package with the same EF 24-105 f4L lens on B&H for $3500. I didn’t need the cheapy tripod that was in the Amazon deal since I bought a Manfrotto in 2012.
Windows Movie Maker has been a cornerstone tool of the amateur video editor for an extremely long time. A lot of video graphers, amateur cinematographers, and simple weekend point-and-shooters have used the free program and have done wonders with it. However, just because something has a history, does not mean that it is necessarily the best product you can be using. After a long time as one of the best free video editors for Windows users, Windows Movie Maker has been discontinued.
So you might be a little intimidated by the idea of a DSLR with the different lenses and the switches and the buttons and you were probably hearing me and others rant about the ISO, APS-C, aperture, etc. and wondered what the heck that is and why they are good or bad... Well, completely understandable. And while I recommend reading some good books on the topic (Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson is an excellent one BTW), this phone has a new feature that is sure to make the transition a lot easier and less intimidating. Now the default LCD information view shows like a feature guide. Basically when you select a mode on the knob, the LCD will actually display an easy to understand summary of what that mode is called and basically what it means for your photo. Sometimes with some basic graphics to represent the differences. I turned this off and is using the old-style view, not because I'm a snob, but because I have used DSLRs before and have a little technical experience with it to know what they mean. The guided view is just too bright and I like the dark theme of the standard information view. But this new way of showing the different modes is actually quite awesome if you're just starting out with DSLR photography.
All the applications we reviewed fulfill the same basic need; however, they differ greatly in their interface layouts, workflows and toolsets. In our tests, we assessed how easy each program is to learn and use. We also tracked how hard the application makes it to perform common tasks like editing video footage; adding effects, transitions and titles; picking menu templates; customizing projects; and burning finished DVDs. We found that all the programs are relatively easy to use once you know your way around the interface, although some were much more straightforward than others.
We have been reviewing video editing software since Top Ten Reviews launched in 2003. We have watched these programs grow from simple timeline editing to include tools that were only dreamed about for programs at the consumer level. Every year, our expert reviewers gather all the best software and use each program to create dozens of videos. The reviewers who evaluate video editing software all have a background in media production, particularly video. They have used the programs they review in a professional environment and in their personal lives. Their reviews and evaluations are informed not only by the hard data they collected but by years of personal experience using these types of applications. 
I sincerely believe that if you purchase any of these products that they will NOT work with a PS3 game system. I get the same thing that others get ... "no input signal" ... from the Pinnacle Studio 14 software included with the Dazzle. However I have the same software game for the PC, and despite TWO different capture attempts with other 3rd party software (which have no trouble capturing screen activities otherwise), the UbiSoft game could not be captured at all. Therefore, if you're using a PS3 and you want to capture your gameplay as video you'd better look elsewhere! I KNOW it can be done because the same game(s) ARE captured by others and you can see the videos on YouTube, so there must be a way. I just haven't found it here with the 'Dazzle'. Frankly, I'm not really dazzled by this hardware. Of interesting note there are two other video capture devices sold by Avid/Pinnacle, however they seem to contradict themselves with their Specifications Pages and Feature Pages. In one the Features says you can capture video from '... game systems and others...' however on the same device's Specifications page nowhere does it stipulate which gaming systems you can capture video from! In the other device it's just the reverse (i.e. Spec page says "... game systems...", and the Features page says nothing about gaming systems). Perhaps it's the PS3, or the Software Programs' video is encoded prohibiting captures? Who knows, perhaps this is a good product for video captures from other sources, but this just doesn't work for my PS3!
This editing software offers three main ways to create your video projects. You can use the Full Feature Editor, which is the familiar timeline, or storyboard, layout used by industry professionals since time immemorial. But in case you're not ready to jump into that quite yet, there's also a simplified editor that automatically creates a video for you in just minutes. Additionally, you can use the Express Project module that allows you to fill in preprogrammed templates with your own content, which teaches you how to use the Full Feature Editor to its fullest potential.
4k and gif support are boilerplate features for most video editing products today, but one thing Filmora does particularly well is titles. Title tools are trending in video software, and while Filmora’s doesn’t have the functionality of say, an Apple Final Cut Pro X, which can superimpose 3D titles over your videos and rotate them on three axes, it nonetheless has some snazzy titling features for the money you’re spending.
Apple’s iMovie has long been one of the most consumer-orientated video editors out there. It’s bundled with all new Macs, and touts some serious practicality for the everyday user. The latest version of the software allows you to import and edit 4K video clips from a variety of external devices, such as smartphones and GoPro cameras, and sports a clean interface that is attractive and easy to navigate. The ability to start editing on iPhone or iPad and finish on a Mac renders it even more convenient.

However, simple editing can be done on the cheap if you’re willing to ditch powerful, high-end software such as Final Cut Pro, or Adobe Premiere, in favor of a more modest program. Let’s face it, you’re probably not going to be taking home the Palme d’Or with the film you cut on your laptop, but your home movies and YouTube uploads can take on a whole new shine with a few straightforward tools.
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