Though Mac users don't have the sheer number of software choices available for PCs, Apple fans interested in editing video are well served, by four products in particular. At the entry level, the surprisingly capable and enjoyable-to-use iMovie comes free with every Mac sold since at least 2011. iMovie only offers two video tracks, but does good job with chroma-keying, and its Trailers feature makes it easy to produce slick, Hollywood-style productions.

At Top Ten Reviews we’ve researched and tested the best video editing software for 14 years. Over the past year, our team of expert reviewers spent more than 155 hours making dozens of videos to evaluate, compare and rate each product. We evaluated, compared and rated each program. In the end, we picked CyberLink PowerDirector as the top choice. Its full array of tools will satisfy both the novice user and the veteran editor. It’s packed with many of the same tools found in professional video editing software. And its 99-track timeline gives you the flexibility to complete complex projects.   
Adding and arranging: When you're ready to make a movie, your first step will be to choose what type of files to add. Options include Video, Audio, Image, Icon, and Lyric. You can add any and all of these to the same project and then move them around on the Timeline until you have them where you want them. And if you're new to this type of program, there's a convenient Movie Wizard to guide you through the process.

Dual Pixel AF is, no question, best-in-class. And it’s still the primary reason to look at the 80D (or even the older 70D from 2013). In my experience focus is superb — dead accurate, fast tracking, silent. Perfect for video. Even if you’re a purist, and prefer manual focus (which you should always learn) nailing initial focus is a treat with the DPAF (45-point); then once you’ve got that you can flick the switch to manual to tweak from there or adjust as a scene develops.
If I had to choose something I dislike about Windows Movie Maker, it would have to be the limit it has in output files. Unlike Avid Media Composer or Adobe Premiere, it seems as though Windows Movie Maker is more limited in the type of files you can export. Also, there isn't much more advanced filters and effects you can customize from. If you're looking to customize your own effects, then maybe Windows Movie Maker isn't right for your project.
True. The 80D “only” shoots up to 1080p HD. If you want 4K, look elsewhere — if you’re into landscapes or travel videography, this may matter to you. The world though is still mostly operating in 1080p. Keep in mind, 4K will multiply (significantly) your storage requirements, in addition to processing power needed to edit and render. Only you can decide if this is the time to make the jump (I still think mainstream 4K adoption is 2+ years away). I love my 4K computer monitors because fonts are razor sharp. Yet, I don’t see substantive different between 80D images and those, say, from a Panasonic G7. The latter looks somewhat digital to my eyes, though it’s still a fine little camera.

FinancesOnline utilizes our proprietary SmartScore™ method to evaluate all the solutions in the Video Editing Software category in orded to help you decide on the best possible service. It evaluates the following factors: cruscial components, collaboration capabilities, custom elements, available integrations, user friendliness, customer support, security, mobile support, ratings in media. At the moment, Final Cut Pro is the leader in this category and our experts are really satisfied with it. After extensive research and analysis it had the best results among its competitors and our reviewers strongly suggest that you consider it as one of the options for your needs.


This free video editor makes it a cinch to export your creations to YouTube, Facebook, Dropbox, Flickr, Google Drive and an assortment of mobile devices through a simple pull-down menu. You have to sign in to these services first. And while YouTube uploaded directly to my channel without incident, you may have to save your video to your hard drive with social media specs and then upload to the social network yourself.
Dual Pixel AF is, no question, best-in-class. And it’s still the primary reason to look at the 80D (or even the older 70D from 2013). In my experience focus is superb — dead accurate, fast tracking, silent. Perfect for video. Even if you’re a purist, and prefer manual focus (which you should always learn) nailing initial focus is a treat with the DPAF (45-point); then once you’ve got that you can flick the switch to manual to tweak from there or adjust as a scene develops.
4k and gif support are boilerplate features for most video editing products today, but one thing Filmora does particularly well is titles. Title tools are trending in video software, and while Filmora’s doesn’t have the functionality of say, an Apple Final Cut Pro X, which can superimpose 3D titles over your videos and rotate them on three axes, it nonetheless has some snazzy titling features for the money you’re spending.

PowerDirector helps you enhance your footage with Intelligent Color Correction. This allows you to quickly and easily match color settings across your entire project, which unifies the look and feel of your video and eliminates a lot of guesswork. This might seem like a small thing, but it’s a huge leap forward for video editing software at the consumer level.

The other advantage of having an APS-C camera is your lens selection. Obviously you get to choose between both EF and EF-S lenses, but that's not what I mean by it. Canon has a very wide selection of EF lenses and you will read a lot about what lenses are great and what lenses are not so great. Well, the faults with the "not so great" lenses typically happen toward the outer edges. That's typically where the complaints would be while the center of the image will generally be good across almost all of Canon's quality EF lens selection. Well, since the APS-C sensor "crops" the image out of the center, you effectively crop out the "bad" parts of even the so-called "bad" lenses. So actually a lot of these lenses that get bad reviews, if you use them on an APS-C camera such as the T7i, you will never notice the faults people complain about with those lenses. I mean, this isn't ALWAYS the case, but if you read the consensus is that the outer parts of the image have distortion or is too dark while the center is fine, you likely would not notice those problems, or will notice them a lot less, while using the T7i combined with that lens.

Finally, we used each program to compress a 4K video file into a smaller resolution. We then examined the results looking for imperfections in the picture such as compression artifacts, motion blur, distortion, ghosting and more. PowerDirector’s results were simply outstanding. We could find almost no indication that the video had been compressed, even when viewed on an ultra-high-definition monitor.
The whole experience is geared around making it as easy as possible to turn your project into reality. There are two modes in this program: Easy and Full Feature. Easy mode guides you through the video editing process step by step. It’s a great way to familiarize yourself with the process. You can create some fine videos in this mode, but to really take advantage of Filmora’s wide toolset, you need to use the Full Feature Mode. This mode gives you access to tools from basic trimming and cropping to advanced features like picture-in-picture editing, audio mixer, chroma-key, split screen, video stabilization and much more. Filmora excels at teaching users to use these tools, and anyone with the patience to learn will find it useful. Filmora also has some of the best sharing options of the programs we reviewed. When you’re done with your project, you can export it to a file, upload it to YouTube (or other video-sharing site) or even burn a DVD.
We evaluated all of the software based on functionality, ease of use, performance, sharing options and new features in the latest versions. We also judged the packages based on real-life uses for a number of categories, including best overall, best free app, best for beginners, best for YouTube maestros, best for Mac users and best for Windows platforms.
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Another program, VSDC Video Editor Pro, simply has too outdated an interface, making common tasks difficult. Longtime pro video editors will note the absence of Avid Media Composer, which is simply too unwieldy for PCMag's primarily consumer audience. There are a couple of more interesting applications—NCH VideoPad and AVS Video Editor among them—that we simply haven't tested yet.

True. The 80D “only” shoots up to 1080p HD. If you want 4K, look elsewhere — if you’re into landscapes or travel videography, this may matter to you. The world though is still mostly operating in 1080p. Keep in mind, 4K will multiply (significantly) your storage requirements, in addition to processing power needed to edit and render. Only you can decide if this is the time to make the jump (I still think mainstream 4K adoption is 2+ years away). I love my 4K computer monitors because fonts are razor sharp. Yet, I don’t see substantive different between 80D images and those, say, from a Panasonic G7. The latter looks somewhat digital to my eyes, though it’s still a fine little camera.

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